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Monday, 24 May 2021 10:53

RichmondCC student first to complete work-based learning internship

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Daija Rivers  the first work-based learning student in the Information Technology program and started her IT learning experience at the Plastek Group in Hamlet in at the beginning of 2021. Daija Rivers the first work-based learning student in the Information Technology program and started her IT learning experience at the Plastek Group in Hamlet in at the beginning of 2021. Contributed photo

HAMLET — Daija Rivers of Anson County chose to study Information Technology at Richmond Community College because she wanted a career in a constantly evolving field.


Rivers, a mother of two, has overcome many obstacles to get where she is today. She has made it a point to be a strong example of perseverance for her children and set goals and push through even when it is difficult.

She has earned three certificates in Information Technology from RichmondCC: Security+ Prep, Information Technology Network Management, and Information Technology Network+ Prep. She will also be graduating in June with an associate in applied science degree and has been accepted to North Carolina A&T University to pursue a bachelor’s degree in Information Technology in the fall. 

“I chose to pursue IT because technology has been an interest of mine for several years. I love how much technology has evolved over the years. I find technology very intriguing and there’s always something new to learn about it,” Rivers said. 

“We depend on technology in some shape or form every day. I want to be as informed and knowledgeable about technology and its functionality as much as possible.”

She is also the first work-based learning student in the Information Technology program and started her IT learning experience at the Plastek Group in Hamlet in at the beginning of 2021. 

“This opportunity was my first technical hands on job experience. Plastek’s, Chris Frank, was very helpful, he guided me and worked alongside of me throughout my internship,” Rivers said. 

“This internship really sharpened my skills and my craft,” she said. 

“My advisor Mr. Lance Barber was there every step of the way throughout my semesters and my teacher Kelley Beam advised me in some areas in career preparations so I was fully prepared from my internship and graduation,” said Rivers. 

“From the start, Daija was eager to progress through the IT program and begin her career. That's what it takes to be successful in this ever-changing field. It takes someone who is excited about IT and committed to lifelong learning,” said Information Technology Program Coordinator Lance Barber.

“Being the first IT Work-Based Learning (WBL) student, will give her the foundation to a great career. I know this will be one of her many accomplishments. I know she will keep up the great work,” said Business Administration Program Coordinator Kelley Beam.

About the Program

The Information Technology curriculum prepares graduates for employment in the technology sector as designers, testers, support technicians, system administrators, developers, or programmers. Graduates use computer software and/or hardware to design, process, implement and manage information systems in specialties such as database services, security, business intelligence, healthcare informatics and others depending on the technical path selected within this curriculum. 

Graduates should qualify for employment in entry-level positions with businesses, educational systems, and governmental agencies which rely on computer systems to design and manage information. The program will incorporate the competencies of industry-recognized certification exams.

Work-Based Learning

Work-based learning allows students to apply what they have learned in the classroom in an actual workplace setting. Students work for an employer in a position directly related to their field of study and must complete at least 160 hours with their WBL employer. This program helps students develop employability competencies that the college has identified as critical to success in the workplace.

Students who participate in WBL will gain valuable benefits during the program, receive college credit towards a degree, refine job search skills, give opportunities to apply classroom instruction in an actual workplace environment and help with career exploration and selection. 

“Work-based learning is an incredible opportunity for our students, and one we are expanding to new employers so more students can take advantage and be better prepared for industry,” said Barber.

For more information about Information Technology at RichmondCC, contact Lance Barber at 910-410-1911 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. To learn more about work-based Learning, contact Patsy Stanley at 910-410-1830 or email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

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