Displaying items by tag: suicide

RALEIGH  — The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services released the North Carolina Violent Death Reporting System Data Dashboard, an interactive online dashboard that provides aggregate information on violent deaths for all 100 counties in North Carolina. The NC-VDRS dashboard, funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, was created to make data more accessible to public health partners to inform the development, implementation and evaluation of prevention efforts around violence and safety. 

Published in Local News

The following free webinars are being offered by Sandhills Center Family Support and Community Collaboration. If you would like to register, contact the person located at the end of each description.

Published in Lifestyle

The following free webinars are being offered by Sandhills Center Family Support and Community Collaboration. If you would like to register, contact the person located at the end of each description.

Published in Lifestyle

RALEIGH — The North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services’ Division of Mental Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services has been awarded the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline’s 988 State Planning Grant through Vibrant Emotional Health, the nonprofit administrator of the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (Lifeline). This grant, totaling $129,555, provides support to begin implementing the Lifeline’s new 988 number.

Published in Local News

HAMLET— Nearly 40 percent of flagged emails from Richmond County students mention either suicide or depression, according to Dr. Wendy Jordan.

Published in Local News

It’s been more than five months since former University of North Carolina Wilmington professor Mike Adams killed himself after being pushed into early retirement for offensive tweets. My friend David French and my colleague Robert Shibley already wrote powerful articles about it, but I knew eventually I needed to say my piece. 

Published in Opinion

When policymakers across the country decided to “lock down” in response to the March outbreak of the novel coronavirus, they took a leap into the unknown. Not only did we know little about COVID-19 itself at that time, but we knew almost nothing about how shutting down nearly all of society would affect people.

Published in Opinion