Wednesday, 03 July 2019 23:30

Man whose pro-gun speech went viral announces candidacy for lieutenant governor

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Mark Robinson, whose pro-gun speech in front of the Greensboro City Council went viral, announced his candidacy for lieutenant governor on Tuesday. Mark Robinson, whose pro-gun speech in front of the Greensboro City Council went viral, announced his candidacy for lieutenant governor on Tuesday. YouTube screenshot

GREENSBORO — Tuesday, Mark Robinson, a native of Greensboro, announced his candidacy for the office of Lt. Governor of North Carolina, in a bid to become the first black lieutenant governor in the state’s history.


Robinson is best known for his viral speech at the Greensboro City Council where he spoke out against a council that was attempting to stop a gun show.  (See video at bottom of the post.)

He announced his candidacy in front of the City Hall building in Greensboro where he gave that viral speech, and was joined by his wife, two kids, and over 80 supporters.

In his announcement speech, he told his life story: How he grew up in Greensboro surrounded by poverty as the ninth of 10 children with an abusive alcoholic father. He talked about spending time in foster care before returning to live with his parents, and how his mother — a woman of faith — encouraged him to pursue his dreams.

He continued on to say that he joined the Army Reserves in high school, serving as a medical specialist. He talked about starting a family with his wife, and the struggles they faced together.

Robinson explained that during his career he has lost two manufacturing jobs to NAFTA, including one job at a company that moved to Mexico.

He explained how he and his wife owned and operated a successful small business, which they later sold — a daycare where they had the privilege of educating and raising the next generation in North Carolina.  

Mark ended his speech with a call to action, telling supporters that every county was important, and that voters needed “a champion for North Carolina.”

Last modified on Wednesday, 03 July 2019 23:42

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