Displaying items by tag: congress

RALEIGH — A new study from researchers at the University of Arkansas and Western Carolina University finds that a Democrat-backed budget bill pending in Congress would slash an average of $1,131 per student in resources for charter schools.

Published in Local News

Veteran Triangle-area Congressman David Price called it a career yesterday and revealed that he will not seek re-election in 2022.

Published in Opinion

WASHINGTON — The American Oath Initiative, a 501(c)4 dedicated to recruiting, training, and supporting veterans who are willing to step forward to seek political office as a means to honoring their Oath to “Defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic” officially launched its efforts (Thursday) in advance of the 2022 elections.

Published in Local News

WASHINGTON — Republicans in Congress, including those representing North Carolina, are seeking detailed answers from the Biden administration over the United States’ catastrophic exit from Afghanistan.

Published in Local News

The late U.S. Rep. Walter Jones, a N.C. Republican, ended his speeches on the House floor about the pitfalls of Afghanistan by asking God’s blessing and protection for our service members. After 20 years in the war-torn country, U.S involvement in Afghanistan ends just as Jones predicted. Yet, one wonders if even he could have foreseen such a botched and embarrassing withdrawal.

Published in Opinion

This weekend, the U.S. experienced another “Saigon moment,” this time in Afghanistan. After a 20-year war that drained trillions from Americans’ pockets, the capital of Afghanistan fell without a fight. The corrupt Potemkin regime that the U.S. had been propping up for two decades and the Afghan military that we had spent billions training just melted away.

Published in Opinion

The push and pull regarding vaccination mandates continues, both on Capitol Hill and in. the state legislature, from Republicans and from Democrats.

Published in Local News

Conventional wisdom holds that the political party in the White House tends to lose seats in mid-term elections. Yet, 1994 turned into a proverbial bloodbath for Democrats.

Published in Opinion

The U.S. House Appropriations Committee voted to cut $40 million from the federal Charter Schools Program, in a major policy shift away from the bipartisan support that charter schools have enjoyed in recent years.

Published in Local News

"When the House revamped its rules in the early days of the pandemic to allow lawmakers to vote remotely," Nicholas Fandos reports at the New York Times, "Representative Ralph Norman of South Carolina was among 161 Republicans who sued to block the arrangement, arguing that it 'subverts' the Constitution."

Published in Opinion
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