Thomas L. Knapp

Thomas L. Knapp

Every two years, independent and "third"-party candidates for various offices scramble to get their names on ballots around the United States.

Here we go again: Fear of a "second wave" of COVID-19 infections is on world tour. Naturally, the same "experts" who demanded a global lockdown/shutdown in response to the "first wave" are saddling up for an encore. Their logic, faulty the first time around, is even more so the second.

Protests quickly broke out nationwide following the May 25 killing of George Floyd by Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin, which was caught on video and quickly went viral.

As the COVID-19 pandemic ran its deadly course in New York, Gov. Andrew Cuomo affirmed a state policy forbidding nursing homes to reject suffering from the disease.

On May 15, city officials declared Atwater, California, a "sanctuary city." Not for undocumented immigrants, but for businesses and churches who choose to ignore Gov. Gavin Newsom's COVID-19-related shutdown orders. The city won't be enforcing the governor's edicts. Those edicts, Mayor Paul Creighton told local businesses, are "between you and the state of California."

Writing at Reason magazine, Eric Boehm notes two trends revealed in data released by Apple and Foursquare.

On April 28, U.S. Rep. Justin Amash (?-MI) launched a presidential "exploratory committee." He wants to take on Republican incumbent Donald Trump and Democratic nominee-apparent Joe Biden this November as the nominee of the Libertarian Party.

Anyone who tries to tell you that the COVID-19 pandemic, and its associated social, political, and economic panics, are good things is  an idiot, or trying to sell you some kind of snake oil, or both. Society-wide disasters are always net negatives, or we wouldn't think of them as disasters in the first place. Silver linings are never as shiny as the clouds they run through are large.

On March 23, 14 U.S. Senators from both major political parties asked U.S. Attorney General William Barr and Michael Carvajal, director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, to “transfer non-violent offenders who are at high risk for suffering complications from COVID-19 to home confinement.”

On March 12, the New York Federal Reserve announced a $1.5 trillion injection of money into the U.S. financial system. Three days later, it cut its benchmark interest rate to zero and announced it would be buying at least $500 billion in government bonds and another $200 billion in mortgage securities.

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